Tuesday, July 18, 2017

*Review* I Don't Know What You Know Me From by Judy Greer


Genre: Memoir
Published: April 8, 2014
Publisher: Doubleday
Pages: 256

Synopsis

You know Judy Greer, right? Maybe from The Wedding Planner, 13 Going on 30, Carrie, Arrested Development, or The Descendants. Yes, you totally recognize her. And, odds are, you already feel like she’s your friend. 

In her first book of essays, I Don’t Know What You Know Me From, Greer writes about everything you would hope to hear from your best friend: how a midnight shopping trip to Walgreens can cure all; what it’s like to wake up one day with stepchildren; and how she really feels about fans telling her that she’s prettier in person. Yes, it’s all here—from the hilarious moments to the intimate confessions.

But Judy Greer isn’t just a regular friend—she’s a celebrity friend. Want to know which celebs she’s peed next to? Or what the Academy Awards are actually like? Or which hot actor gave her father a Harley-Davidson? Don’t worry; Greer reveals all of that, too. You’ll love her because, besides being laugh-out-loud funny, she makes us genuinely feel like she’s one of us. Because even though she sometimes has a stylist and a makeup artist, she still wears (and hates!) Spanx. Because even after almost twenty years in Hollywood, she still hasn’t figured everything out—except that you should always wash your face before bed. Always.

Review

Judy Greer is one of those actors that is in literally every movie to ever exist. But she always plays a role that’s important and crucial to the movie, but not very memorable. I’ve seen a bunch of her movies, and I recognize her in them all. And I can list you the movies she’s in. But I cannot tell you the name of a single one of her characters. (Although that shouldn’t really mean much coming from me, because I’m horrible at names.)

One very important thing to note is that she has the single greatest name of all time. Not including her middle and last name, I mean. And yet she chooses to shorten it with the WORST version of our name. It’s a travesty! Nobody tell my grandmother I said this, because that’s how she shortens her name as well.

Reading this did make me appreciate her much more than I already did. She’s made a carrier out of playing the best friend. Which helps make the main character more accessible to the audience. So, basically, we’re all lucky she’s taken these roles. Thanks, Judy!

I found her story to be quite entertaining. It wasn’t super exciting, but it was incredibly relatable. Also, I really appreciated how she included her step family. I think it’s important that people recognize that just because a family isn’t blood doesn’t make it less of a family.

Before reading this I never paid attention to IMDB ranks. But I totally just checked her profile, because I know she does, and I saw she’s in the top 500. Also her rank jumped up quite a bit from last week. I will absolutely claim credit, because I read this book. And doing so made everyone so excited about her. I don’t blame them.

4 Platypires - Joood - Hooligan



Buy the Book


About the Author

Judy Greer is an American actress with an extremely wide range of films and television projects under her belt. She is probably best known by fans of Arrested Development as Kitty and in films such as 13 Going on 30 (in some countries Suddenly 30) as the awkward best friend of Jennifer Garner's character Jenna.

Some of Judy's other film and Television credits include: 27 Dresses, 2 and a Half Men, How I Met Your Mother and Jeff who lives at Home. To fans of the show Archer, Judy is known for her voice role as Cheryl.

Judy's most current film project is Kimberly Peirce's adaptation of Stephen King's Carrie as the kind gym teacher, Miss Desjardin who tries to stop Carrie's bullies.

In July 2014, Judy will be seen as the chimpanzee Cornelia, the wife and queen of ape king Caesar played by her Suddenly 30 co-star Andy Serkis.

Judy has two other projects coming out in 2015 including Tomorrowland and Disney/Pixar's The Good Dinosaur.

Monday, July 17, 2017

*Deja Revu* 17 July 2017

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Déjà Revu is a weekly review round-up that is open to all book review blogs.
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Original
Meme
Response
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Fantasy
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Contemporary
Fantasy
Paranormal
Romance
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Contemporary
Dystopian/Post Apocalyptic
Fantasy
Romance
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Dystopian/Post Apocalyptic
Fantasy
Graphic Novel
Historical
Horror
Romance
Science Fiction
Suspense/Thriller
Women's Fiction

#MadLibMonday - Pucked by Rachel Walter

When I was growing up, I loved Mad Libs. The excitement of sort of writing your own story really appealed to me. So I thought it would be fun to mesh that love with my love of books by turning blurbs into mad libs and letting you guys write your own book blurbs. 

For anyone that doesn't know how Mad Libs work, I will ask you for certain parts of speech or other specific things (i.e.: date, age, color, etc.) which you will write down. After you have completed your list, scroll down below the cover image to find the redacted blurb. Then read through it substituting your words where applicable. Try not to laugh. (Laughing is actually strongly encouraged, because this is supposed to be funny.)

Some brief definitions of the parts of speech.
Noun: Person, place, or thing.
Verb: Describes or indicates action.
Adverb: Modifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb expressing manner, place, time, or degree (gently, here, now, very).
Adjective: Names an attribute of a noun (pretty, blue, large)
Pronoun: A word that can function as a noun (I, we, they)
Preposition: a word that combines with a noun or pronoun to form a phrase that usually acts as an adverb, adjective, or noun (on, after, for)

And with that, here we go.

1: Noun
2: Verb ending in s
3: Noun
4: Adjective
5: Verb
6: Verb
7: Plural noun
8: Adjective
9: Verb
10: Noun


Genre: YA Romance
Published: February 8, 2015
Pages: 328

Does life get in the way of love or does love get in the way of life?

Riley Silk, (   1: Noun   ) of the Warrior’s Ice Hockey team at Dalesburg High, doesn’t think life can be lived if love is present. If there’s two things in life he (   2: Verb ending in s   ) to be true, it’s that love causes pain and (   3: Noun   ) is his ticket to a better life. He’s worked hard to maintain his Frozen Silk reputation in order to stay focused on his duties and goals.

Audrey Jacobs, the Warrior’s number one fan, believes life can’t be lived without love. She can find love and beauty in the (   4: Adjective   ) of situations. Her best friend, Riley, is under a lot of stress at home, so she does her best to (   5: Verb   ) his mood whenever she can.

When lines cross and blur, they (   6: Verb   ) to keep control of the simplicity their friendship once held. With Audrey’s outlook on life usually surrounded by light, the growing darkness of her (   7: Plural noun   ) and insecurities threaten to deflect her toward the wrong path. 

Can she find her (   8: Adjective   ) self before her world burns around her? When truths become lies, can Riley find the strength to (   9: Verb   ) his way through his own personal darkness that clings to his mind and soul? Can he win this face-off that life has dropped in his zone, or will fate take him out of the game completely?

Who keeps the (   10: Noun   )?

Now that your fun is through, here's the real blurb for Pucked by Rachel Walter. 

Does life get in the way of love or does love get in the way of life?

Riley Silk, captain of the Warrior’s Ice Hockey team at Dalesburg High, doesn’t think life can be lived if love is present. If there’s two things in life he knows to be true, it’s that love causes pain and hockey is his ticket to a better life. He’s worked hard to maintain his Frozen Silk reputation in order to stay focused on his duties and goals.

Audrey Jacobs, the Warrior’s number one fan, believes life can’t be lived without love. She can find love and beauty in the muddiest of situations. Her best friend, Riley, is under a lot of stress at home, so she does her best to brighten his mood whenever she can.

When lines cross and blur, they struggle to keep control of the simplicity their friendship once held. With Audrey’s outlook on life usually surrounded by light, the growing darkness of her doubts and insecurities threaten to deflect her toward the wrong path. 

Can she find her true self before her world burns around her? When truths become lies, can Riley find the strength to fight his way through his own personal darkness that clings to his mind and soul? Can he win this face-off that life has dropped in his zone, or will fate take him out of the game completely?

Who keeps the puck?

If you enjoyed this mad lib, comment with your list below (if you dare) so the rest of us can get a chuckle out of it as well. - Katie 

#MadLibMonday - Cry of the Sea by D.G. Driver

When I was growing up, I loved Mad Libs. The excitement of sort of writing your own story really appealed to me. So I thought it would be fun to mesh that love with my love of books by turning blurbs into mad libs and letting you guys write your own book blurbs. 

For anyone that doesn't know how Mad Libs work, I will ask you for certain parts of speech or other specific things (i.e.: date, age, color, etc.) which you will write down. After you have completed your list, scroll down below the cover image to find the redacted blurb. Then read through it substituting your words where applicable. Try not to laugh. (Laughing is actually strongly encouraged, because this is supposed to be funny.)

Some brief definitions of the parts of speech.
Noun: Person, place, or thing.
Verb: Describes or indicates action.
Adverb: Modifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb expressing manner, place, time, or degree (gently, here, now, very).
Adjective: Names an attribute of a noun (pretty, blue, large)
Pronoun: A word that can function as a noun (I, we, they)
Preposition: a word that combines with a noun or pronoun to form a phrase that usually acts as an adverb, adjective, or noun (on, after, for)

And with that, here we go.

1: Noun
2: City
3: Plural noun
4: Verb
5: Two-digit number
6: Verb
7: Noun
8: Mythical creature, plural
9: Adjective
10: Verb


Genre: YA Paranormal
Published: February 23, 2014
Publisher: Fire and Ice Young Adult Books
Pages: 208
Goodreads // Amazon

Juniper Sawfeather is choosing which (   1: Noun   ) to attend after graduation from West Olympia High School next year. She wants to go to (   2: City   ) to be far away from her environmental activist (   3: Plural noun   ). They expect her to (   4: Verb   ) the way they do, but having to be constantly fighting causes makes it difficult to be an average (   5: Two-digit number   )-year-old high school student. Why do her parents have to be so "out there?"

Her feelings on the subject are changed when she and her father (   6: Verb   ) to the beach after a reported oil spill. As they document the damage, June discovers three humans washed up on the (   7: Noun   ), struggling to breathe through the oil coating their skin. At first she thinks they must be surfers, but as she gets closer, she finds out that these aren't humans at all. They're (   8: Mythical creature, plural   )!

Now begins a complex story of intrigue, conspiracy and manipulation as June, her parents, a marine biologist and his (   9: Adjective   ) young intern, her best friend, the popular clique at school and the oil company (   10: Verb   ) over the fate of the mermaids.

Now that your fun is through, here's the real blurb for Cry of the Sea by D. G. Driver.

Juniper Sawfeather is choosing which college to attend after graduation from West Olympia High School next year. She wants to go to San Diego to be far away from her environmental activist parents. They expect her to think the way they do, but having to be constantly fighting causes makes it difficult to be an average seventeen-year-old high school student. Why do her parents have to be so "out there?"

Her feelings on the subject are changed when she and her father rush to the beach after a reported oil spill. As they document the damage, June discovers three humans washed up on the beach, struggling to breathe through the oil coating their skin. At first she thinks they must be surfers, but as she gets closer, she finds out that these aren't humans at all. They're mermaids!

Now begins a complex story of intrigue, conspiracy and manipulation as June, her parents, a marine biologist and his handsome young intern, her best friend, the popular clique at school and the oil company fight over the fate of the mermaids.

If you enjoyed this mad lib, comment with your list below (if you dare) so that the rest of us can get a chuckle out of it as well. - Katie 

#MadLibMonday - Dragon Hunter by Carina Wilder

When I was growing up, I loved Mad Libs. The excitement of sort of writing your own story really appealed to me. So I thought it would be fun to mesh that love with my love of books by turning blurbs into mad libs and letting you guys write your own book blurbs. 

For anyone that doesn't know how Mad Libs work, I will ask you for certain parts of speech or other specific things (i.e.: date, age, color, etc.) which you will write down. After you have completed your list, scroll down below the cover image to find the redacted blurb. Then read through it substituting your words where applicable. Try not to laugh. (Laughing is actually strongly encouraged, because this is supposed to be funny.)

Some brief definitions of the parts of speech.
Noun: Person, place, or thing.
Verb: Describes or indicates action.
Adverb: Modifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb expressing manner, place, time, or degree (gently, here, now, very).
Adjective: Names an attribute of a noun (pretty, blue, large)
Pronoun: A word that can function as a noun (I, we, they)
Preposition: a word that combines with a noun or pronoun to form a phrase that usually acts as an adverb, adjective, or noun (on, after, for)

And with that, here we go.

1: Adjective
2: Verb, past tense
3: Noun
4: Verb, past tense
5: Adjective
6: Plural noun
7: Adjective
8: Noun
9: Verb ending in ing
10: Noun


Genre: Paranormal Romance
Published: March 11, 2016
Pages: 352

Neko is a skilled, (   1: Adjective   ) Hunter who's always kept to herself. When she's (   2: Verb, past tense   ) by a stranger to take down the most gorgeous, alluring (   3: Noun   ) she's ever met, her life becomes more interesting than she ever (   4: Verb, past tense   ) for. 

Lumen is a powerful, (   5: Adjective   ) Dragon shifter, one of the legendary Kindred. As Alpha of the Dragons' Guild, he has (   6: Plural noun   ) to his own kind and isn't looking for a mate. That is, until he meets the (   7: Adjective   ), dangerous Hunter who's been hired to take his (   8: Noun   ). To complicate matters, he can't stop (   9: Verb ending in ing   ) about her, and his inner Dragon is pretty sure they're meant to be together.

Will unrelenting (   10: Noun   ) win out over duty? 

Now that your fun is through, here is the actual blurb for Dragon Hunter by Carina Wilder.

Neko is a skilled, powerful Hunter who's always kept to herself. When she's hired by a stranger to take down the most gorgeous, alluring man she's ever met, her life becomes more interesting than she ever bargained for. 

Lumen is a powerful, gorgeous Dragon shifter, one of the legendary Kindred. As Alpha of the Dragons' Guild, he has responsibilities to his own kind and isn't looking for a mate. That is, until he meets the beautiful, dangerous Hunter who's been hired to take his life. To complicate matters, he can't stop thinking about her, and his inner Dragon is pretty sure they're meant to be together.

Will unrelenting desire win out over duty? 

If you enjoyed this mad lib, comment with your list (if you dare) so that the rest of us can get a chuckle out of it as well. - Katie 

Sunday, July 16, 2017

#SneakPeekSunday - All the Wind in the World by Samantha Mabry

Title: All the Wind in the World
Author: Samantha Mabry
Genre: YA Magical Realism
Published: October 10, 2017
Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers
Pages: 288
Goodreads

Synopsis

Sarah Jacqueline Crow and James Holt work in the vast maguey fields that span the bone-dry Southwest, a thirsty, infinite land that is both seductive and fearsome. In this rough, transient landscape, Sarah Jac and James have fallen in love. They’re tough and brave, and they have big dreams. Soon they will save up enough money to go east. But until then, they keep their heads down, their muscles tensed, and above all, their love secret.

When a horrible accident forces Sarah Jac and James to start over on a new, possibly cursed ranch called the Real Marvelous, the delicate balance they’ve found begins to give way. And James and Sarah Jac will have to pay a frighteningly high price for their love.

Sneak Peek Review

I received a copy of this sneak peek from Algonquin Young Readers through Netgalley. This is my honest review. 

I hate that all I had for this was a sneak peek! I still have so many questions about what the heck is even going on in the world portrayed in this story. To me, it seems to be a near-future dystopian (basically everything west of the Mississippi is desert apparently), but the feel of society is a bit like during the Great Depression as portrayed in East of Eden by John Steinbeck. So maybe it's not a dystopian at all and is actually set in the not so distant past. I'm just not sure and haven't seen enough of the story to make a final conclusion. 

Then there is the relationship between Sarah and James. I would apparently have understood it better had I read the blurb before starting the sneak peek (one of these days I'll learn my lesson, I really will). It seemed like they were a couple, but they kept telling us that they're cousins, so that confused me. Based on the blurb, they clearly really are a couple and for some reason it's important for everyone else to think that they're cousins, which makes no sense to me at this point in the story (and is one of the biggest reasons why I wish I had the whole thing). 

In the sneak peek they had just gotten to the Real Marvelous ranch and because I have a decent understanding of foreshadowing and what it typically means for the future of a story, I know that stuff is going to get bad for them at Real Marvelous, like really bad, and probably really strange and almost unexplainable. And all of that worries me because these are kids and I don't want bad things to happen to them, and I need to know that they are okay. 

So, I'm going to have to buy this book at some point to make sure that Sarah and James ultimately survive and find their happy for now at the very least, because that is what I hope for them. - Katie 

Buy the Book


About the Author

Samantha Mabry grew up in Texas playing bass guitar along to vinyl records, writing fan letters to rock stars, and reading big, big books, and credits her tendency toward magical thinking to her Grandmother Garcia, who would wash money in the kitchen sink to rinse off any bad spirits. She teaches writing and Latino literature at a community college in Dallas, Texas, where she lives with her husband, a historian, and her pets, including a cat named Mouse. She is the author of the novels A Fierce and Subtle Poison and All the Wind in the World. Visit her online at samanthamabry.com or on Twitter: @samanthamabry.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

*Review* A Million Junes by Emily Henry


Genre: YA Fantasy
Published: May 16, 2017
Pages: 350

Synopsis

For as long as Jack “June” O’Donnell has been alive, her parents have had only one rule: stay away from the Angert family. But when June collides—quite literally—with Saul Angert, sparks fly, and everything June has known is thrown into chaos.

Who exactly is this gruff, sarcastic, but seemingly harmless boy who has returned to their hometown of Five Fingers, Michigan, after three mysterious years away? And why has June—an O’Donnell to her core—never questioned her late father’s deep hatred of the Angert family? After all, the O’Donnells and the Angerts may have mythic legacies, but for all the tall tales they weave, both founding families are tight-lipped about what caused the century-old rift between them.

As Saul and June’s connection grows deeper, they find that the magic, ghosts, and coywolves of Five Fingers seem to be conspiring to reveal the truth about the harrowing curse that has plagued their bloodlines for generations. Now June must question everything she knows about her family and the father she adored, and she must decide whether it’s finally time for her—and all the O’Donnells before her—to let go.

Review

I received a copy of this book through Penguin's First to Read program in exchange for an honest review. 

This book sucked me in (and I know I've been saying that a lot lately, but when I started reading this book, I wanted to completely ignore my reading responsibilities like proofreading just to read this book. I wanted to ignore books I was being paid to read in order to read this book. I didn't do it, but I wanted to so bad.) 

So in the beginning, it seems like this is just going to be a story about a simple family feud in a small town. Sure, there are some weird things that happen around June's house, but kids and teenagers can have overactive imaginations and exaggerate stuff. But it turns out this was not coming from June's imagination. 

There were several layers to this story. There was the mystery about why the O'Donnell's and the Angerts don't like each other. Then there was the budding romance between June and Saul even though they were never supposed to be anywhere near each other. Okay, so there are really two layers to this story, because these two things really seem to influence everything else, but it felt like there were more layers. 

I couldn't help rooting for June and Saul to triumph in their goals while also worrying that spending so much time together was just going to end up hurting both of them because I absolutely bought into the small town folklore, it was compelling. 

I would definitely recommend this book to fans of YA paranormal. It will tug your heartstrings and keep you turning the pages until the end. 5 stars. - Katie 

Buy the Book


About the Author

Emily Henry is full-time writer, proofreader, and donut connoisseur. She studied creative writing at Hope College and the New York Center for Art & Media Studies, and now spends most of her time in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the part of Kentucky just beneath it. She tweets @EmilyHenryWrite.

Friday, July 14, 2017

*Stacking the Shelves* 15 July 2017


(Titles link to Amazon via Amazon Affiliate links)

Stacking The Shelves is a feature/weekly meme created by Tynga’s Reviews in which you share the books you are adding to your shelves, both physical and virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical stores or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!

Now, I already have a monthly post I do featuring the books I get in the mail (and it's a lot because I have a serious Goodreads First Reads giveaway addiction), and I'm going to try to start posting my monthly Read-A-Thon posts again too (even if none of the Platypires will be joining me), which will cover the books I receive through Netgalley. But I also go to my thrift store at least once a week, and often leave with a bag full of books. It's such a common occurrence that I'm known as The Book Lady to the frequent volunteers (and I suspect that they've started scheduling their $1 bag of books sales for Thursdays simply because that is the day I usually visit.) So my Stacking the Shelves posts are going to focus on my thrift store hauls, because this is my blog and I do what I want. 

On that note, here are the books I picked up this week.

The Rainbow Comes and Goes by Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt - I have had my eye on this book for about a month. I finally decided to cave and get it this week. 
Bad Girls Don't Die by Katie Alender - The cover of this book contains the words Katie and die, so I had to buy it. It doesn't matter that Katie is the author and not the MC. 
I Have Lived a Thousand Years by Livia Bitton-Jackson - The tagline for this book is Growing Up in the Holocaust. Like I've mentioned many times before, I've always been fascinated by the Holocaust. 
Look Again by Lisa Scottoline - The blurb for this book sounds a lot like The Face on the Milk Carton but from a parents perspective. I found it intriguing. 
Train Go Sorry by Leah Hager Cohen - I picked up this book because the title made me think of Me Talk Pretty One Day. Then I read the description and found out it's a book about the lives of deaf people, or something like that (I haven't read the book yet so I can't say for sure.) 
Lost Battalions: The Great War and the Crisis of American Nationality by Richard Slotkin - This is a book about African American battalions during WWI and how the government failed to uphold promises made to them after the war was over. 
We're Just Like You, Only Prettier by Celia Rivenbark - The cover of this book made me think of Toddlers and Tiaras, which happens to be one of my shameful reality tv addictions. 
Eyewitness to History edited by John Carey - I feel like I was on a bit of a non-fiction kick this week at the thrift store. It may be time to sit down and read a serious non-fiction book for me. 
How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez - I don't read enough diverse literature. Maybe this will help. 
Phones and Ferb: Thrill-O-Rama by Kitty Richards - I'm supposed to pretend I bought this for my kids, but I'm kind of excited to read it because I like Phineas and Ferb. 
Claw the Giant Ape by Adam Blade - I think I have some of the Beast Quest books already, but maybe not. It seems like it would appeal to boys around my son's age though, so it was worth snagging. 
Black Star, Bright Dawn by Scott O'Dell - Based on the cover of this book, I assume it's about Native Americans or eskimos. It's geared towards middle grade children, and I try to buy my kids diverse books to read. 
Sweet Little Lies by Lauren Conrad - The book has candy hearts on the cover. For some reason that appealed to me. 
Wild Wings Flight Manual: Fly Your Own Microplane by Joseph Casalese - My son asked to get this book. Flipping through it, it actually looks incredibly informative. And his aunt Jaimie would be thrilled to know he wanted it. 
Legend by Marie Lu - So the copy of this book that I got is a naked hardcover, but I recognized the author's name (the cover for War Cross has had me lusting after that book for a while now). I figured it was worth a try.
You Smell Dead by Christ P. Flesh - I picked up another book from this series last week, so I was really happy to see this one when I was at the thrift store this week. It's like a Monster High book without being a part of the Monster High franchise. 
Where There's a Wolf, There's a Way by Lisi Harrison - This is a Monster High book. I think I have two of the other books in this series already, so when my daughter saw this on the shelves I was excited, for her of course. 
Embrace Me by Lisa Samson - The cover makes me think of a traveling circus from around the same time period as Water for Elephants. I enjoyed that book, so figured I might like this one.
Lies You Learned at School by Michael Powell - I'm intrigued by the title.
Maelstrom by Anne McCaffrey and Elizabeth Ann Scarborough - I'm a big fan of Anne McCaffrey's books, so whenever I find any of them (even the ones she co-wrote) I buy them!
Snowy the Surprise Puppy by Jenny Dale - This is a really short chapter book that I think my 6 year old could reasonably read to me. I had not problem agreeing when she asked if we could buy it.
The Littlest Piglet by The Clever Factory - I did not want to get this book because it's a board book and my kids are too old for new board books...but this one has a finger puppet thing, so I relented.
Sammy the Snail by Katie Hewat - This is another board book with the puppet thing going on, so even though I abhor board books at this point in my kids lives, I relented and let them get it.
Smoke and Shadows by Tanya Huff - This is a mystery, which I typically avoid, but it's got paranormal elements to it like vampires and stuff, so I figured I'd give it a shot.
Smoke and Mirrors by Tanya Huff - Same as above.
Anna of Byzantium by Tracy Barrett - YA historical fiction. What's not to love.
Pandora Gets Lazy by Carolyn Hennesy - I picked up a book from this series last week, so I was thrilled to find more this week.
Pandora Gets Jealous by Carolyn Hennesy - Three down, like four to go, I think, maybe. I'm not sure.
The King's English by H.W. & F.G. Fowler - I actually thought reading this could be helpful to me with my proofreading. It was a good score.
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III - I feel like I've seen talk about this book on Facebook recently. If nothing else, it's one of Oprah's Book Club picks, and I like to buy those.
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens - The literary snob in me wants to own all the classics.
This is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz - The author is a Pulitzer Prize winner. Even though I haven't read that book yet, I figured I should grab this when I saw it in case the dude's writing is good.
Geek Love by Katherine Dunn - I fake reviewed this book in the last couple weeks over at Whose Review is it Anyway at my husband's suggestion, and the blurb intrigued me. Finding a copy at the thrift store was a major score.
Sugar and Spice by Lauren Conrad - This goes with the other Lauren Conrad book I picked up this week. I couldn't get one and not the other.
Passarola Rising by Azhar Abidi - It's historical fiction and the cover intrigues me.
Matched by Ally Condie - The cover made me pretty sure this book is YA, and I tend to enjoy YA fiction. Also the cover is intriguing.
The Polish Officer by Alan Furst - It's set in 1939. You should all know by now that's a time period that greatly interests me.
Let's Pretend this Never Happened by Jenny Lawson - The cover of this book features a mouse that appears ready to perform Hamlet. Couldn't resist.
The True Story of Hansel and Gretel by Louise Murphy - Another book set during the WWII era in Poland.
Lost in the Storm by Holly Webb - This is another short chapter book that I think my 6 year old could just about read to me. And it's about a kitten.
Among the Stars by Jodi Lynn Anderson - This just looks really interesting. I don't care if it's a middle grade book.
365 Great Cookies You Can Bake by Lois Hill - I had to buy this book because that's my aunt's maiden name. I'm sure she's not the author, but oh well.
Careers for Bookworms & Other Literary Types by Marjorie Eberts and Margaret Gisler - Obviously I needed this book. I believe this list alone is evidence of that.
Earth: A Visitor's Guide to the Human Race by Jon Stewart et al. - This book has been on my Amazon wish list for a while. This was a great find.
Beautiful Bitch by Christina Lauren - Book 3 in the series. These books sat on the shelves at the thrift store for a full week before I picked them up.
Beautiful Beginning by Christina Lauren - Book 6 in the series.
Beautiful Bombshell by Christina Lauren - Book 4 in the series.
Beautiful Bastard by Christina Lauren - Book 1 in the series.
Beautiful Player by Christina Lauren - Book 5 in the series. So apparently I'm missing book 2 and everything after book 6. Pretty great score still.
Sweet Filthy Boy by Christina Lauren - Book 1 in a different series. It was there, so I needed it.

So that's all the books I picked up this past week at my thrift store. This haul cost me a whopping $6 (the cookbook was $2 by itself). One of the volunteers was trying to find space on the shelves for new arrivals while I was searching, so I did my best to help clear up some room for her. I'd say I did a decent job of it for being just one person. She's welcome.

What new books did you add to your shelves this week? - Katie
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Thursday, July 13, 2017

*Review* A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin


Genre: Fantasy
Published: October 17, 2005
Pages: 1061

Synopsis

With A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth volume of the landmark series that has redefined imaginative fiction and stands as a modern masterpiece in the making.

After centuries of bitter strife, the seven powers dividing the land have beaten one another into an uneasy truce. But it's not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters of the Seven Kingdoms gather. Now, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed while surprising faces—some familiar, others only just appearing—emerge from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges of the terrible times ahead. Nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages, are coming together to stake their fortunes...and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests—but only a few are the survivors.

Review

I really need to start putting holds on this books before I finish the one before it. Although that doesn’t really matter anymore, because there’s only one more. I should probably actually start watching the show eventually.

I can’t decide if I like Cersei or not. Seeing as Tyrion is one of my favorites, I feel as if I’m betraying him by liking her. But I still silently cheered over some of her actions. Even if I think she’s a crazy bitch.

Maybe my issues are because it didn’t have enough Tyrion or Daenerys. Or maybe because there was just way too much damn filler in this one. I mean, there’s a whole lot of awesome stuff going on. But there’s so much boring crap that I’m pretty sure I actually zoned out because I’d have to go back and figure out what I missed.

Sansa is becoming much more of someone I can tolerate. I might have even started to like her a bit by the end of the book. I haven’t decided that yet either.

Anyway, I feel like there’s a wave going on with these books. It’s pretty much a pattern by this point. Odd number books are SUPER EPIC AND I LITERALLY CANNOT PUT THEM DOWN BECAUSE OF HOW MUCH IS GOING ON and even numbers are really awesome but there’s always something about them that makes them just a bit not as great as the last book. And it’s only barely a 4 platypire rating.

I kinda don’t want to continue the series if only because there’s only one more book. I mean, what if it ends in a way I’m not okay with?! And I’ve heard there are things in the show that are different… but I really liked how they were in the books. I am torn. I’ll probably eventually get to it, but I’m putting this on hold for now.

4 Platypires - Joood - Hooligan

Buy the Book


About the Author

George R.R. Martin sold his first story in 1971 and has been writing professionally since then. He spent ten years in Hollywood as a writer-producer, working on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and television pilots that were never made. In the mid ‘90s he returned to prose, his first love, and began work on his epic fantasy series, A Song of Ice and Fire. He has been in the Seven Kingdoms ever since. Whenever he’s allowed to leave, he returns to Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he lives with the lovely Parris, and two cats named Augustus and Caligula, who think they run the place.

Monday, July 10, 2017

#MadLibMonday - The Wolf Mirror by Caroline Healy

When I was growing up, I loved Mad Libs. The excitement of sort of writing your own story really appealed to me. So I thought it would be fun to mesh that love with my love of books by turning blurbs into mad libs and letting you guys write your own book blurbs. 

For anyone that doesn't know how Mad Libs work, I will ask you for certain parts of speech or other specific things (i.e.: date, age, color, etc.) which you will write down. After you have completed your list, scroll down below the cover image to find the redacted blurb. Then read through it substituting your words where applicable. Try not to laugh. (Laughing is actually strongly encouraged, because this is supposed to be funny.)

Some brief definitions of the parts of speech.
Noun: Person, place, or thing.
Verb: Describes or indicates action.
Adverb: Modifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb expressing manner, place, time, or degree (gently, here, now, very).
Adjective: Names an attribute of a noun (pretty, blue, large)
Pronoun: A word that can function as a noun (I, we, they)
Preposition: a word that combines with a noun or pronoun to form a phrase that usually acts as an adverb, adjective, or noun (on, after, for)

And with that, here we go.

1: Verb
2: Adjective
3: Noun
4: Four digit year
5: Adjective
6: Noun
7: Verb
8: Plural body part
9: Noun
10: Verb



Genre: Historical Romance
Published: February 14, 2017
Publisher: Fire & Ice Young Adult Books
Pages: 217
Goodreads // Amazon

Changing places doesn’t always help you (   1: Verb   ) things differently.

Cassie throws the first punch in a brawl at Winchester Abbey Girl’s School. Her subsequent suspension is a glitch in Cassie’s (   2: Adjective   ) plan; Finish School/Get Job/Leave Home (and never come back). As punishment her mother banishes her to Ludlow Park, their creepy ancestral (   3: Noun   ). In the dark of a stormy night Cassie finds herself transported to (   4:   Four Digit Year   ), the beginning of the Georgian period.

With the help of a lady’s maid and an (   5: Adjective   ) gentleman, Mr Charles Stafford, Cassie must unravel the mysterious illness afflicting Lord Miller. If Lord Miller kicks the bucket the house goes to Reginald Huxley, the brainless (   6: Noun   ) from London.

Cassie’s task is to figure out who is poisoning the Lord of Ludlow without exposing herself to the ridicule of her peers, getting herself committed to the asylum or worse, married off to the first man who will have her.

Cassie must learn to (   7: Verb   ) her tongue, keep her pride in check and reign in her rebellious nature – because the fate of her entire family, for generations, rests on her (   8: Plural body part   ).

Meanwhile, Lady Cassandra Miller frantically searches for her smelling salts or her trusted governess Miss. Blythe, whose soothing advice she would dearly love. Instead Cassandra finds some woman and a boy squatting in the Ludlow (   9: Noun   ); her father, her lady’s maid and all the servants have magically disappeared.

Tell-a-vision, the In-her-net, horseless carriages and women wearing pantaloons; Cassandra is afraid that she might have inhaled fowl air causing her to temporarily lose her senses.

Only when both girls can get over their pride, societal prejudices and self-importance will they be able to (   10: Verb   ) to their rightful century. Until then, they are free to wreak maximum damage on their respective centuries.

Now that your fun is through, here is the real blurb for The Wolf Mirror by Caroline Healy.

Changing places doesn’t always help you see things differently.

Cassie throws the first punch in a brawl at Winchester Abbey Girl’s School. Her subsequent suspension is a glitch in Cassie’s master plan; Finish School/Get Job/Leave Home (and never come back). As punishment her mother banishes her to Ludlow Park, their creepy ancestral home. In the dark of a stormy night Cassie finds herself transported to 1714, the beginning of the Georgian period.

With the help of a lady’s maid and an obnoxious gentleman, Mr Charles Stafford, Cassie must unravel the mysterious illness afflicting Lord Miller. If Lord Miller kicks the bucket the house goes to Reginald Huxley, the brainless cousin from London.

Cassie’s task is to figure out who is poisoning the Lord of Ludlow without exposing herself to the ridicule of her peers, getting herself committed to the asylum or worse, married off to the first man who will have her.

Cassie must learn to hold her tongue, keep her pride in check and reign in her rebellious nature – because the fate of her entire family, for generations, rests on her shoulders.

Meanwhile, Lady Cassandra Miller frantically searches for her smelling salts or her trusted governess Miss. Blythe, whose soothing advice she would dearly love. Instead Cassandra finds some woman and a boy squatting in the Ludlow mansion; her father, her lady’s maid and all the servants have magically disappeared.

Tell-a-vision, the In-her-net, horseless carriages and women wearing pantaloons; Cassandra is afraid that she might have inhaled fowl air causing her to temporarily lose her senses.

Only when both girls can get over their pride, societal prejudices and self-importance will they be able to return to their rightful century. Until then, they are free to wreak maximum damage on their respective centuries.

If you enjoyed this mad lib, comment with your list below (if you dare) so that the rest of us can get a chuckle out of it as well. - Katie 
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